CFS Monetary Measures for July 2021

Today we release CFS monetary and financial measures for July 2021. CFS Divisia M4, which is the broadest and most important measure of money, grew by 3.9% in July 2021 on a year-over-year basis versus 4.4% in June.

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_Jul21.pdf

For more information about the CFS Divisia indices and the data in Excel:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm_data.php

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY
3) ECST –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

FT Letter: Investors shouldn’t bet too much on macro forecasts

Today my letter in the Financial Times (FT) responds to Howard Marks’ “Investors must not bet too much on macro forecasts.”  Marks offers a superb road map for navigating future inflation twists and turns.

However, he misses how macro rules of nature can often be measured – helping investors and public officials better achieve their respective goals.

Monetary measurements represent simply one meaningful mapping.

To view “Inflation was inevitable after the Fed fuelled monetary growth”:
https://www.ft.com/content/2f7f1bad-ed6b-4a6a-9123-0eb024541c8a

We look forward to any comments you might have.

CFS Monetary Measures for June 2021

Today we release CFS monetary and financial measures for June 2021. CFS Divisia M4, which is the broadest and most important measure of money, grew by 4.5% in June 2021 on a year-over-year basis versus 7.0% in May.

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_Jun21.pdf

For more information about the CFS Divisia indices and the data in Excel:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm_data.php

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY
3) ECST –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

Now, Inflation is Clear and Global

Across the board higher consumer price inflation in the United States removes any ambiguity or doubt regarding the existence of price pressures beyond transitory or base effects.

Overall consumer prices increased by 5.4% on the year ending in June. Core inflation increased by 4.5% over the same period.  In fact, in the last 4 months, both overall and core inflation exceeded market expectations and increased relative to the previous month’s release.

The phenomenon also extends well beyond simply the United States. It is global.

A diffusion index of every inflation release relative to the prior release for 49 countries shows an upward impulse since the beginning of the year. More pointedly, a diffusion index of reported inflation relative to expectations for the same complex of countries illustrates how actual inflation has been exceeding expected inflation especially since May 2021.
(see Figures 1 and 2… www.CenterforFinancialStability.org/amfm/studies/Global_inflation_071421.pdf)

The Center for Financial Stability (CFS) has been clear about risks and financial stability implications.  Our first email on April 22, 2020 noted how the initial impulse in the signal from CFS broad money would be a period of disinflation followed by inflation.

Inflation Fears Offers the Fed a Chance to Modernize with Money
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Modernize_Money_042621.pdf
Post-Pandemic Economic Risks
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Post_Pandemic_Economic_Risks_050521.pdf

June CFS Divisia money and financial liability data will be released on August 2 at 9:00 AM ET.

The present global macro backdrop for investors and officials is one of the most challenging and complex in decades. We look forward to any comments you might have.

CFS Monetary Measures for May 2021

Today we release CFS monetary and financial measures for May 2021. CFS Divisia M4, which is the broadest and most important measure of money, grew by 7.0% in May 2021 on a year-over-year basis versus 12.2% in April.

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_May21.pdf

For more information about the CFS Divisia indices and the data in Excel:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm_data.php

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY
3) ECST –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

Money Growth Falls – Inflation Threat Remains…

CFS broad money growth slowed to 12.1% on a year-over-year basis in the latest reading for April down from 23.8% in March.

The initial response might be to assume that the large expansion of money is reaching an end. This would be a mistake. The “base effect” elevating monetary growth on a year-over-year basis began to end in March 2021 and fully finished in April 2021. A few issues include:

  • CFS Divisia monetary growth of 12.0% in April dwarfs average growth of 5.6% since 1967 (DM4- excluding Treasury bills).
  • A high frequency reading of CFS monetary data stretching back over 54 years portrays a radically different perspective regarding the performance of broad money and its implications for inflation. It highlights how broad money growth and inflation risks are actually beginning to accelerate (chart available on request).

On April 22, 2020, we were early and clear in our email message “CFS Money Growth Soars to double digits.” The initial impulse embedded in the signal from CFS broad money would be a period of disinflation followed by inflation.

Going forward, inflation will likely continue its upward ascent and stretch beyond the Fed’s comfort zone.

The present global macro backdrop for investors and officials is one of the most challenging and complex in decades. We look forward to any comments you might have.

For more on CFS Divisia money and inflation:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Modernize_Money_042621.pdf
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Post_Pandemic_Economic_Risks_050521.pdf

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_Apr21.pdf

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY
3) ECST –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

Post-Pandemic Economic Risks

Professor William A. Barnett – Director of Advances in Monetary and Financial Measurement at CFS – evaluates present economic policy risks within the context of the ten-year period beginning in 1941.

The post-pandemic period could see a similar conflict between Treasury’s desire to minimize the cost of government debt finance and the Fed’s need to moderate inflation.

A primary harbinger of inflationary pressures would be a surge in liquid monetary assets held in the economy.

Unfortunately, there has been a steady decline in the quality and quantity of money market data available from the Fed – a void that has been partially filled by CFS.

To view the full article:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/research/Post_Pandemic_Economic_Risks_050521.pdf

CFS Monetary Measures for March 2021

Today we release CFS monetary and financial measures for March 2021.  CFS Divisia M4, which is the broadest and most important measure of money, grew by 24.0% in March 2021 on a year-over-year basis versus 27.8% in February.

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_Mar21.pdf

For more information about the CFS Divisia indices and the data in Excel:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm_data.php

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM <GO>
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY <GO>
3) ECST <GO> –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY <GO> –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

Fed changes money; New CFS Divisia Monetary and Financial Measures

On February 23, 2021, the Federal Reserve Board implemented major changes to “streamline” the H.6 statistical releases.  The depth and timeliness of available monetary data diminished significantly.  For instance:

– The publication frequency of the release will change from weekly to monthly.
– Institutional money market funds will be discontinued this year.
– The release will contain only monthly average data – weekly average, seasonally adjusted data will no longer be provided.
– Monetary aggregates will no longer provide a breakdown of components by banks and thrifts.

A series of papers commenting more deeply on these changes as well as implications for financial markets and the economy will be forthcoming.

We apologize for any inconvenience related to the delayed distribution of CFS monetary and financial measures.  A recalibrated and fortified Advances in Monetary and Financial Measurement (AMFM) data set and release is available below.

A hearty thanks to Jeff van den Noort, Ryan Mattson, Liting Su, and especially Professor William A. Barnett – CFS Director of AMFM.

We look forward to any comments you might have.
—-

Today we release CFS monetary and financial measures for February and January 2021.  CFS Divisia M4, which is the broadest and most important measure of money, grew by 28.1% in February 2021 on a year-over-year basis versus 28.5% in January.

For Monetary and Financial Data Release Report:
http://www.centerforfinancialstability.org/amfm/Divisia_Feb21.pdf

March 2021 data will be released on May 03, 2021 at 9:00 AM ET.

Bloomberg terminal users can access our monetary and financial statistics by any of the four options:

1) ALLX DIVM <GO>
2) ECST T DIVMM4IY <GO>
3) ECST <GO> –> ‘Monetary Sector’ –> ‘Money Supply’ –> Change Source in top right to ‘Center for Financial Stability’
4) ECST S US MONEY SUPPLY <GO> –> From source list on left, select ‘Center for Financial Stability’

Post BREXIT Risk Conference / Call for Papers

An important United Kingdom economics conference “Post BREXIT: Uncertainty, Risk Measurement and COVID-19 Challenges” is being held online on June 22-23.  Call for Papers information is below.

CFS Director of Advances in Monetary and Financial Measurement (AMFM) Professor William A. Barnett will be delivering a keynote lecture “Is the BREXIT Bifurcation Causing Chaos in the United Kingdom?”

Other keynotes include:

David Aikman: Professor of Finance and Director of the Qatar Centre for Global Banking and Finance, King’s Business School, King’s College.
Patrick Minford: Professor of Applied Macroeconomics at Cardiff University.
Professor Jagjit Chadha: Director of the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR).
Professor Costas Milas: Professor of Finance at the Management School, University of Liverpool.

The Call for Papers at the U. of Birmingham is at:
https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/business/events/2021/post-brexit-uncertainty-risk-measurement-covid19-challenges.aspx

If you would like to submit a paper, the Call for Papers contains a link to another online page providing more details about the conference and instructions about deadlines and how to submit.  The conference will produce special issues of two journals (Economic Modeling, and European Journal of Finance).

The conference is open to the public with no registration fee.  The Call for Papers contains a link to the registration page.