FRB Vice Chair Randal Quarles Reviews FSB Activity

Federal Reserve Board Vice Chair Randal K. Quarles reviewed Financial Stability Board (“FSB”) activity and raised issues that continue to affect the global financial system. In a speech at the European Banking Federation’s European Banking Summit, Mr. Quarles highlighted the following:

OTC Derivatives. The FSB focused on the following issues as to OTC derivatives: (i) central clearing of standardized OTC derivatives, (ii) trading standardized OTC derivatives on an exchange or through an electronic trading platform, (iii) “reporting to trade repositories” and (iv) capital and margin requirements.

Prudential Bank Standards. Mr. Quarles addressed the work done by the Basel Committee to improve prudential standards for internationally active banking organizations (a/k/a “Basel III”). Mr. Quarles said that each of the 24 FSB jurisdictions have implemented the fundamentals of Basel III to incorporate risk-based capital and liquidity measures.

Key Attributes for Effective Resolution. As a solution to the “too-big-to-fail” dilemma, the FSB published “Key Attributes for Effective Resolution.” Mr. Quarles explained that the guidance offered procedures for national resolution regimes to follow if an important financial institution is failing.

Nonbank Financial Intermediation (“NBFI”). To better understand NBFI, the FSB conducted a “global monitoring exercise” and concluded that the overall size of NBFI to the global economy was $184 trillion. The FSB report also contained categories of NBFI activity and identified potential vulnerabilities.

Mr. Quarles also emphasized two issues the FSB is monitoring concerning the future of the global financial system.

– Financial Innovation. Mr. Quarles said that in response to an “explosion of financial innovation” in recent years, the FSB published a report on the potential implications and benefits of FinTech for the global financial system. Mr. Quarles highlighted multiple regulatory issues, such as (i) operational risks from third-party service providers, (ii) cyber risks and (iii) macrofinancial risks that may arise from FinTech activity.

– Market Fragmentation. While noting that market fragmentation will never “disappear,” Mr. Quarles explained that since the financial crisis, there have been growing concerns that globalization in the markets is slowing down. Mr. Quarles said that the FSB is working to assess the possible implications of market fragmentation, such as (i) the potential for regulatory “arbitrage” and (ii) an increased regulatory burden on firms.

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