Treasury Gets Specific, Recommends Significant Regulatory Reform

The U.S. Treasury Department (“Treasury”) released a report pursuant to President Trump’s February Executive Order establishing core principles for improving the financial system (see previous coverage). Drafted under the direction of Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin, the report is the first of a four-part series on regulatory reform and covers the financial regulation of depository institutions. Subsequent reports will focus on areas including markets, liquidity, central clearing, financial products, asset management, insurance and innovation.

The report contained the following Treasury recommendations, among others:

  • Capital and Liquidity: (i) raise the threshold for participation in company-run stress tests to $50 billion in total assets (from the current threshold of more than $10 billion), (ii) tailor the application of the liquidity coverage ratio appropriately to include only global systemically important banks and internationally active bank holding companies, and (iii) remove U.S. Treasury securities, cash on deposit with central banks, and initial margin for centrally cleared derivatives, from the calculation of leverage exposure.
  • Volcker Rule: modify the Volcker Rule significantly, by (i) providing a full exemption for banks with $10 billion or less in total assets, and (ii) evaluating banks with greater than $10 billion in total assets based on the volume of their trading assets. Treasury also recommended a number of other measures to reduce regulatory burdens and simplify compliance, such as further clarifying the distinction between proprietary trading and market-making.
  • Stress Testing: increase the asset threshold from $10 billion to $50 billion, and allow regulatory agencies to make discretionary decisions for a bank with more than $50 billion in assets based on “business model, balance sheet, and organizational complexity.”
  • Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”): restructure the CFPB to provide for accountability and checks on the power of its director, or subject the agency’s funding to congressional appropriations. (Treasury criticized the “unaccountable structure and unduly broad regulatory powers” of the CFPB, and concluded that the structure and function of the agency has led to “regulatory abuses and excesses.”)
  • Residential Mortgage Lending: ease regulations on new mortgage originations to increase private-sector lending and decrease government-sponsored lending.

Treasury also outlined its support for the idea of creating an “off-ramp” from many regulatory requirements for highly capitalized banks. This approach would require an institution to elect to maintain a sufficiently high level of capital, such as a 10% non-risk weighted leverage ratio.

Lofchie Comment: At last, a regulatory discussion that says something more than “there was a financial crisis, so there must be more rules, and more rules will make us safer.” This report reads as if it was informed by real work experience. It is a recognition of both the costs and benefits of financial regulation.

The report is not an attack on government. While critical of Dodd-Frank, Treasury acknowledges the better aspects of it, particularly improvements in bank capital ratios. In sum, Treasury is making the point that Dodd-Frank is seven years old; hundreds of rules have been adopted under it, and the time has come to see what aspects of it are working or not. (If there is anyone out there who believes after seven years of Dodd-Frank that it’s all going swimmingly, that person is just not paying attention.)

The biggest question is whether those who have disagreements with the recommendations will argue why the particulars are wrong, or whether the debate will simply be about the evils of Wall Street and the Administration. After seven years of Dodd-Frank (did someone break a mirror?), it really is time to talk specifics.

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